top of page
Search
  • melissa39316

My mother. The conversation continues.

Oct. 17, 2014



Martha Nell Hardy

On Oct. 14, 2005, my spectacular mother, Martha Nell Hardy, died. I was with her when she passed away, for which I am profoundly grateful. She was unconscious; she had been for several days. Perhaps she didn't know I was there. I hope she did, but I can't be sure.

We are not a religious family and I have come full circle from ridiculous Roman Catholic convert steeped in studies of doctrinal development (my graduate school experience) to avowed and crusty pantheist, by which I mean that I revere creation, but do not put any credence whatsoever in the existence of some single entity that invented and now micromanages the universe according to some cosmic game plan. Sorry, guys, but no. So I don't think she has gone to Heaven. I think she has gone to me. She probably has gone to other people as well, undoubtedly my brother Peter, but I can't speak of their experience. I can only speak of mine.


In the years following her death, I have become more and more like her. I especially notice this with my children, with whom I increasingly interact in much the same way she did. And I am grateful for this, because I think I wasn't a very good mother before, so maybe she's helped me make up for some of the bad years.


Then there's knitting. I've always knitted, but now I knit maniacally. And the way I'm going, I might even challenge her record for dying with the most yarn and, let me tell you, hers was an AWESOME record.


I've also taken the torch from her as regards politics. She read several papers daily, listened to liberal commentators on TV and ranted with a vehemence and clarity that I now see in myself. As readers will know from previous blogs, I listen to political podcasts all day long and am more than willing to speak my mind, loudly, and for a very long time, indeed, perhaps ad nauseum -- you be the judge. Had she lived, I would have gotten her hooked on podcasts, which she would have enjoyed more than newspapers because she could knit and inform her opinions at the same time.


Some might say that it was inevitable that I become like my mother over time, not some voodoo mystery transformational experience wherein her spirit, upon leaving her body, flowed into mine. She was, after all, my mother and provided me with both nurture and nature. But no. I think her spirit, upon leaving her body, did flow into mine, for which I am very, very grateful. It means I don't have to miss her so much, because, guess what? She's right here. And because I loved her so much, it means I like me more.


Mom, I love you. Thank you for being my mother.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Guns

Sept. 28, 2009 I'm not keen on guns, but I don't object to people having a reasonable number of them if that's what they absolutely have to have and I don't object to hunting as long as the animals ki

bottom of page